Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?
Experience Sitecore! | Software every good Sitecore developer should be aware of

Experience Sitecore!

Martin Miles on Sitecore

Software every good Sitecore developer should be aware of

Got your top-spec developer's machine with Visual Studio installed, an instance of SQL Server with databases and Sitecore running on your IIS? So far, so good. You may now start working with platform. However, for real productivity you may need certain extras we'll now go through.

  1. Sitecore Rocks
  2. Team Development for Sitecore
  3. Reflector
  4. dotPeek
  5. Sitecore Instance Manager
  6. Luke
  7. RoboMongo

1. Sitecore Rocks
Today Rocks became a mature plugin allowing unbelievably wide range of Sitecore tasks and activities right from your Visual Studio. It grew from an idea of being able to manipulate Sitecore tree right from Solution Explorer (without permanent switches to browser and back), but with time acquired a mass of killing features, covering all aspects of working with Sitecore. Let's just name few of them:

  • navigate Sitecore tree within VS, create and edit items, layouts, renderings, templates (and their hierarchy), standard values, and also manage Media Library
  • built query analyzer (that was removed from 7.5 into a SPEAK component) that allows to operate all types of queries
  • troubleshooting features addressing tracing and debugging as well as log manager
  • view scheduled jobs
  • all about publishing
  • administration functions to perform maintenance for database, indexes etc; view resulting (after patches) web.config file
  • ability to read Lucene indexes, navigate documents and see field values, terms etc.
  • perform real-time search and replace globally from Query Analyzer
  • view history table
  • everything about creating and managing packages
  • create pipelines
  • all about caching
  • plugin repository to extend functionality further more by applying multiple plugins
Impressive list? But how to manage such wide functionality and not get lost?
Luckily, there is handy Commandy feature that allows you quickly search and access all the features just by a hotkey!

Links:
Sitecore Rocks on Visual Studio Gallery
Documentation page
28 days with Sitecore Rocks technical blog



2. Team Development for Sitecore - TDS
Another Visual Studio extension worth of several separate articles. It is manly focused on resolving troubles of having sitecore itens and sitecore code seperately, so it solves the issue by serializing items and keeping them in source control along with the code so that multiple people working at the same solution can have solid commits and fair versioning policy.

TDS can help you with many other handy tasks like item merging, code generation, packaging and auto deployment, config transformation and others. If you follow the link below - you'll get ver y self-descriptive home page explaining what exactly and how TDS does.

Links:
TDS download page


3. Reflector
Not Sitecore specific, but .NET-wide, Reflector is a tool that decompiles and reveals the code hidden in DLL libraries (if not obfuscated) and allows browse it and drill into system DLLs as well. We use it widely with Sitecore as Sitecore is not allways specific about ints internal architecture in official documentation, but knowing internals is the must for any good developer. A good example can be pipelines architecture - it is not quite documented (if at all) while from time to time one would need to override default behavior or add additional processors. Without knowing what exactly original code does that becomes not possible.

Links:
Reflector download page


4. dotPeek
One more .NET decompiler (which is free, unlike previously mentioned Reflector) have recently joined the market. Apart from doing decompiling job, it has several useful features, like ability to generate PDB files out of DLL, that makes possible debugging of external DLLs in Visual Studio.

  • Exporting decompiled code to Visual Studio projects
  • Support downloading code from source servers or PDB files generation
  • Quick jump to a type, assembly, symbol or type member
  • Effortless navigation to symbol declarations, implementations, derived and base symbols, and more
  • Accurate search for symbol usages with advanced presentation of search results
  • Overview of inheritance chains
  • Syntax highlighting and complete keyboard support
Please read another blog post Debugging and Inspecting Sitecore Libraries to how you can easily do that with dotPeek.
Links:
dotPeek official home page

5. Sitecore Instance Manager - SIM
I have a separate article about SIM, so please read that if you are not yet familiar with this brilliant tool. If briefly, SIM simplifies and automates a process of installing an instance of Sitecore (any version you may have in your local repo) to just few clicks, automatically sets up database and configs, installs additional packages and modules on top of instance and keeps multiple useful housekeeping links (to hosts, configs, iis, database etc.) in one place.

Links:
Sitecore Instance manager on Sitecore Marketplace
My previous article about Sitecore Instance Manager in this blog


6. Luke
Luke.NET is a tool to browse Lucene indexes, see the documents, fields and terms, try writing queries against index and see index physical structure. This functionality is partly covered with Rocks, as described above.


Links:
Luke page on CodePlex


7. RoboMongo
For everyone who is after Sitecore 7.5 (and later) and is working with xDB, Robomongo may seem quite handy. What is does is allows to see what you have in your Mongo instance. RoboMongo embeds the same JavaScript engine that powers MongoDB's mongo shell. It means that you can reuse your existing skills of MongoDB shell in RoboMongo. It provides you with syntax highlighting, auto-completion, different view modes (text, tree, custom), and more.There will be a separate article about it coming shortly.


Links:
Official page

blog comments powered by Disqus